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Melthucelha Smith
Melthucelha Smith

Buy Slot Car Racing Sets ##HOT##


Best of all, RC Superstore is the perfect resource for newcomers and veterans alike. We have an expansive catalog of the best slot cars and tracks, and a passion for sharing what we love about the hobby.




buy slot car racing sets


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At RC Superstore, we carry a massive selection of HO scale slot car sets from AFX, the undisputed leader in HO slot car racing. Better still, you can add different track sections to customize your slot car track layouts.


In addition, you will find AFX tri-power module transformers, replacement race controllers, and tune-up kits that will make your slot car experience all the more enjoyable. Best of all, these top industry products are available at everyday affordable prices.


Fans of real-world racing may love the chance to get behind the scale model wheel of this 2019 Ford GTE, which finished the LeMans 24-hour endurance race at 5th place in their class. In fact, of the top 10 in their class, three teams raced this car.


Slot car racing is sure to provide you with that real racing thrill that you can enjoy for hours! From AFX and Auto World to Pioneer and Scalextric, RC Superstore is proud to bring customers the highest-quality slot cars available for sale.


Slot car racing (also called slotcar racing or slot racing) is the competitive hobby of racing with powered miniature autos (or other vehicles) which are guided by grooves or slots in the track on which they run.


Slot cars are usually models of actual automobiles, though some have bodies purpose-designed for miniature racing. Most enthusiasts use commercially available slot cars (often modified for better performance), others motorize static models, and some "scratch-build," creating their own mechanisms and bodies from basic parts and materials.


Slot car racing ranges from casual get-togethers at home tracks, using whatever cars the host makes available, to very serious competitions in which contestants painstakingly build or modify their own cars for maximum performance and compete in a series of races culminating in a national championship. Some hobbyists, much as in model railroading, build elaborate tracks, sculpted to have the appearance of a real-life racecourse, including miniature buildings, trees and people, while the more purely competitive racers often prefer a track unobstructed by scenery.


Slot car racing was a popular fad in the 1960s, with sales reaching $500 million annually, including 3,000 public courses in the United States alone. The fad sputtered out by the start of the 1970s as amateurs felt squeezed out at races and stayed home[1] in additions to competitions against the radio-controlled car market.[2]


In addition to the major scales, 1:43 in 2006 slot car sets are generally marketed as children's toys. So far, there is little organized competition in 1:43, but the scale is gaining some acceptance among adult hobbyists for its affordability and moderate space requirements. An average car would be 4.3" (10.9 cm).


Shop and club tracks used for competition (especially in 1:32 and 1:24 scales) are usually hand built "Routed Tracks" in which the guide slots for the entire racecourse are routed into one or a few large pieces of sheet material (such as chipboard or Medium-density fibreboard) providing a smooth and consistent surface.


Generally, tracks for formal competition may have banked corners and may bridge one section over another, but may not otherwise use "trick" configurations. Home tracks often include special features to increase the drama and/or challenge of racing, such as slots that wiggle or squeeze the lanes together, bumps, airborne jumps, or uneven surfaces, but these are typically called "toy" tracks and are not used for competition.


1:24 Scale tracks used for competition are generally 6-8 lane routed tracks with either wooden or flexible plastic retaining walls. The tracks are usually located in commercial or purpose-built racing centres. Most of the tracks used in the USRA regional and national events are either original American Raceways (AMF) commercial tracks or variations of these designs made from original blueprints. Tracks used in other countries, including those used for the ISRA World Championships are often more recent designs. Generally tracks used for regional or national competition have an epoxy or polymer painted surface with recessed braided electrical contacts. In USRA Division 1, the use of traction-enhancing compounds on the racing surface ("glue" or "goop") may be applied to the racing surface by the competitors.


One type of 1:24 commercial track is the "Blue King" (155 foot lap length) which is the track that is recognized for world records in 1:24 racing[3] The 2017 world record qualifying lap is held by Brad Friesner at 1.347 seconds, which computes to 78.45 mph. The "King" track segments are "named" starting from the main straight in an anti-clock wise direction: bank, chute, deadman (corner), finger, back straight, 90 (corner), donut (corner), lead-on, and top-turn. Generally the "King" tracks are used for wing-car racing, where un-banked "flat" tracks of various designs are used for scale racing. An example of a championship "flat" track is the Gary Gerding designed track installed in July 2007 at Mid-America Raceway and Hobbies[4] near Aurora, IL (the site of the 2009 USRA Division 2 National Championships)and the 2010 ISRA world championships.


HO Scale competition tracks are typically between 60 and 100 ft in length and 4 to 6 lanes wide. Plastic tracks, often modified for improved performance, are more common in HO competition than in the larger scales, as is the use of large home courses for formal racing.


1:24 racing is usually at 14 volts for qualifying and 12 volts under racing conditions. 1:32 racing is between 12 and 16 volts depending on type of car. Most HO rules require tracks to provide voltage between 18.5 and 19.0 volts, and at least 5 amperes per lane. Certain European 1/24 "scale" racing events use 18.2 to 19.0 volts DC.


Most racing organisations allow a "track call" (where the power is turned off) for a situation where a race car is in the wrong lane. This is also referred to as a "rider" and is considered to be a dangerous and unfair situation. Track calls are also sometimes used in the event that a car flies off the table and cannot be located by a marshal.


1:24 scale racing organizationsThere are many different local, regional, national, and international organizations for 1:24 scale slot cars. 1:24 scale is primarily raced at commercial slot car raceways. The largest USA organisation, holding 2 Divisional USA National Championship events every year, is the USRA: United Slot Racers Association established in January 1968 (Southern California). The International Slot Racing Association (ISRA) sanctions a World Slot Car Racing Championship in a different country every year.


The USRA (United Slot Racers Association) is the organizer of the USRA National Championship for Division 1 and Division 2 racing. The USRA also sanctions the "Wing Car Worlds" when it is held in the United States.


National Slot Car Scale Racing Association known as NSCSRA. NSCSRA formed in 1989 for the purpose of promoting "Fair and Equal Racing for all" who enjoyed slot cars as a hobby. The rules were established in 1989 to insure the fair and equal racing concept for all participants. Up to four times a year NSCSRA holds a Championship for various classes including Vintage Scale Racing, Flexi and Unlimited Racing.


In 2004, the True Scale Racing Federation (TSRF) was established by former pro 1:24 racer Phillipe de Lespinay (aka: PdL) with the goal being to establish a North American "true scale" 1:24 and 1:32 North American racing series. The TSRF concept is very similar to full-scale "spec" racing where only TSRF approved equipment can be used for competition. Many other countries have national organisations, for example the British Slot Car Racing Association (BSCRA) have been running national championships since 1964.


HO organizationsThere are two large HO racing organizations in the US: HOPRA (the HO Professional Racing Association) and UFHORA (the United Federation of HO Racers Association). Each hosts a national competition annually, usually in July. There are many statewide organizations running under HOPRA and/or UFHORA rule sets.


"The Fray In Ferndale" boasts the largest turnout of any slot car race in the world. The highly competitive race is held yearly, in March, and more than 100 individuals and 16 teams, show up to race on 8 tables. This is the race that determines the direction that the hobby takes. The race has been held since 1997.[5][6]


HO Scale Oval racing is very popular in the Northeastern United States. The cars are molded to look like Dirt Modifieds and Sprint Cars. The Sprint Cars and Dirt Modified cars are raced on oval tracks anywhere from 8 lanes to 4 lanes.


Most 1:24 racing series use some variation of the USRA Division 1 or Division 2 rules. The USRA rules have their roots in the NCC rules of the early 1970s which were written with the goal of making a number of under-classes in slot racing to allow more diversity in competition.


Note: in spite of the USRA not yet recognizing "Division 3", independent sanctioning bodies on the east and west coast have been organizing and hosting Nostalgia Can-Am and Nostalgia F1 races. D3 retro racing was created by Paul Sterrett and Mike Steube in April 2006. This was the beginning of retro racing as we know it today. Several events such as the Sano in Chicago, Illinois, Checkpoint Cup in Buena Park, California and "R4" in Columbus, Ohio have hosted large-scale Nostalgia and Retro racing events.


F-2000 is raced primarily in the midwest; it is a variation of the USRA Division 1 rules with the prime exception being traction/braking "glue" is not allowed to be applied to the racing surface by participants. Motor changes once the race has started are not allowed, and there are other rules restrictions intended to reduce the cost of participation. 041b061a72


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